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Ready to Run

Aaron and I have been housesitting for family for the past two weeks, so while our adventures have taken a back burner to chores and pet watching, I wanted to revisit a few of my favorite foot trails here in Redding. Cookie loves to run and play so we are out jogging every chance we get, but finding safe, dog-friendly places to go can be difficult. Check out these spots if you’re looking for a great workout and you’d like to bring your pup along.

Redding River Trail

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The Sacramento River Trail has been a local favorite for many decades. Boasting over 20 miles of hiking, biking, and walking trails, it borders many of Shasta County’s most scenic areas, including the 44 Bridge to Downtown Redding, the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay, Redding River Park, Keswick Dam and Reservoir, and even reaching all the way to Shasta Dam via the Sacramento Ditch Trail.

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In more recent years however these trails have become a point of contingency for local activists and trailgoers. The increasing frequency of littering, squatting and even assault and battery have deterred many cyclists and joggers from attending the trails closer to Downtown. 

We prefer to run on Hornbeck Trail, accessible from Quartz Hill Road just a ten-minute drive from anywhere in central or West Redding. While a bit rocky in some places, the trail is mostly clear of brush and debris, poison oak is sparse, and traffic is usually light or nonexistent, and it even features benches and a vault toilet restroom close to the parking area. Cookie loves to play in the reservoir or frolic in the adjacent creek on a hot day. 

Clear Creek/Swasey Trail System

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Because habitual joggers are being forced out of town and onto more rural trails, Clear Creek Gorge and the Swasey Trail System have become increasingly popular destinations. The well maintained paths aren’t as scenic as the River Trail but have unique upgrades such as a gazebo area with picnic tables, plyometric equipment, and even a monument standing at Horsetown containing a bit of local history even I was unaware of. Clear Creek is also great for swimming in summer, but be cautious of areas with rapid water, as the creek is known to be a rafting/tubing destination and a few unfortunate accidents have occurred in the Gorge over the years.

WARNING: The trail crosses Clear Creek Road multiple times over the duration of the full hike, so always keep pups leashed and be careful of oncoming traffic while crossing the road. This is a winding country road and many drivers go faster than what allows for safe stopping distance. Stop, look, and listen for traffic (remove headphones if you’re playing music) before resuming your run.

The Swasey trail continues on to Whiskeytown Lake’s southern trail system, and for those who enjoy long-distance running, hiking or backpacking, this is a fabulous gateway to all that the National Park has to offer.
Whiskeytown Lake Trails

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Whiskeytown Lake has over 50 miles of walking, hiking, biking, horseback and backpacking trails to be utilized right at Redding’s backdoor. The year-round trails are constantly maintained, frequently visited, and well illustrated through many trail maps and guides available online and in print. Cookie and I have personally hiked nearly every trail in the NRA, but our favorite trails are the four on the Waterfall Passport, which can be printed off the park’s website or picked up at the Visitor Center. At each waterfall there is a plate which can be rubbed (with chalk or colored pencil) and when all four have been completed, turned in for a reward – a colorful bandana stating “I Walked The Falls.” 

Almost every time we finish a hike or jog in the park, we stop on the shoreline along the highway and have a dip and a game of fetch at one of the many sandy beaches on the lake.

Remember:

ALL the listed trails require dogs to be leashed and preferably well-behaved. Please remember to bring doggie bags as well. Nobody likes to dodge land mines on their walk or jog!

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